25 Days and.. No Crocodiles (Yet)

About a week before I was scheduled to catch my flight out here to the Philippines I came across an article (with photo) stating that the Guinness World Record people had just verified the capture of the largest crocodile on record.. here in the Philippines. Now, up until the moment I came across that article all my mental images of swimming here involved crystal clear waters with some bright, tropical fish to observe and not a care in the world as I floated around the warm waters sipping on a coconut drink, complete with mini-umbrella, that some beautiful Filipina kept refreshing for me as I basked in the sunshine. (I have a very active imagination, as you can tell.)

Well, it’s been mostly storms since I got here so.. no trips to the beach yet. Although I am thankful forLolong-the-record-breaking-Croc-of-the-Philippines1 the break in the heat, these cool breezes are nothing less than a God-send of joy. But.. nobody said anything about giant crocodiles.

Right away I started Googling everything I could about crocodiles, where they live and what (or who) they eat. Saw some vicious video, geez.. crocodiles are one cranky animal with zero sense of humor. Suddenly my mental image of bobbing lazily in the beach involved being surrounded on all sides by beady eyed dinosaurs of the water looking for a quick meal. Like my ex-wife used to tell me, “If the Martians ever land here, you know they’re going to eat the big ones first.” At 230 pounds I’d be a floating buffet.

Ignorance is not always bliss. In this case my fears were set aside only when I came to learn that crocodiles do not normally frequent the sunny beaches I plan to do my relaxation at. They prefer the salt-water swamps, inland near the provinces like Agusan, where the one I read about was caught. I felt a sigh of relief. That was until I started thinking about piranhas. Did some more Googling. Nope, don’t have to worry about those unless I’m in Venezuela. Man-eating sharks? The three hot-spots for human-shark encounters turned out to be Florida, Australia and Northern California. Another sigh of relief. I hear you have to keep an eye out for sharp coral, ‘rock fish’ which are poisonous so it’s best to wear fins or water-sandals. And the smaller sharks they do have around here are usually at 20 feet.. much further than I usually venture so.. another sigh of relief.

World-Record-Crocodile-in-Agusan

That only leaves one other concern of mine.. rip-tides. I’ve seen the Google-Earth ocean floor images off the coast-line along the beachs of Mactan. It’s largely a long, shallow extension of shallow water from the beach and then.. a sudden drop down into the Deep Blue Abyss. I’ve been caught in a riptide once before in Southern California. It was one of those few moments in my life I surely thought I was going to die that day. Fortunately a life-guard showed up just as I made it back to reaching bottom and I made it back to shore, exhausted but shaken to the core. I haven’t gotten much information on the rip-tides (or if they even have them here) but I keep imagining that deep, cliff-like drop-off of island underwater and can’t help but think the ocean is hungry to draw something into it.. including me. Staying in the shallow water is the plan until I get more info on this.

So, for the most part my fears have been assuaged. I arrived in Mactan and walked out of the airport feeling much better about the situation. That was until I got settled into my studio and discovered a variety of ‘critters’ that had taken up residence ahead of me. The first one to really freak me out was the Giant Spider (see my video below) I encountered returning home on my 5th day or so. I managed to get some video before setting about terminating him. Fortunately I did not have the video camera running to record the screaming, cursing and hysteria involved in trying to kill that insanely fast and wicked creature. It turned out there was no screen on the bathroom window and any creature that cared to could just crawl right in. I got the handyman to fix that priority one.

But now that meant a variety of creatures was now trapped in the studio with me. I knew something was there, hiding. So I went to the grocery store and got some cans of Baygon Insect Killer. I sprayed all the inside floorboards, window-sills, door-sills , under the bed, cabinets and bathroom walls. After a while, that stuff started smelling kinda good. That’s when I knew it was time to get out of the studio for the day so it could air-out. I took a cab to Cebu and spent the day exploring SM Mall and catching a movie.

I returned home and it was nothing short of a holocaust of insects. They say roaches can survive nuclear radiation. Well, whatever is in that Baygon spray had them hating life big-time. They were insanely big too. Not a small one in the lot. Each one as big as your thumb and writhing in agony. I used some paper as a scoop and put them all in the toilet. Several flushes later.. no more roaches. Until the next day. For about three days they kept staggering out begging for death. That was too good for them. They were giving me the heebie-jeebies and deserved to be banished to the septic tank. Within 5 days, no more bugs. It’s been almost 2 weeks and.. nothing. I guess word got out that entering my studio meant a sure-fire death sentence. I can rest in peace again. But I still have a green Baygon can at the ready for touch-up perimeter sprays every week.

The only creature I had hoped to have hanging around my domicile which I have sadly not seen is a monkey. I’ve loved monkeys all my life. Each day I’d look longingly at the trees that shade my front porch.. hoping to see a small monkey I could feed bananas, or lumpia, or whatever else he was in the mood to eat. I mentioned to my girlfriend that it’s been weeks and I still haven’t seen a monkey in my front yard. She crushed all my expectations by simply saying, “There aren’t any monkeys on Mactan. What were you thinking?”

I don’t know.. maybe not thousands of monkeys but, just one monkey to hang out and chat with over breakfast maybe.

Well, no monkeys for now.. but no crocodiles either. I’ve still got some wonderful weather, friendly people, good food and plenty of time to enjoy it all. Life is good and I can’t ask for much more than that. Except maybe more time with either my girlfriend.. or my own monkey. Preferably both.

Henry ‘Reekay’
www.LifeBeyondTheSea.com


Author: Reekay

After 49 years living in Southern California, USA, I decided to move to the Philippines despite never having been here before. In July, 2012, I took a leap of faith and transplanted myself to the amazing Philippines. I am a single man taking an honest look at all that the islands here have to offer, one day at a time. I hope you find my LBTSea site informative, entertaining and hopefully a bit of each. 🙂 Be sure to visit the Forum and other parts of what the site has to offer. Browse around and be sure to sign up for updates via email. Enjoy!
— Reekay

7 comments

  1. I don't blame you for the rip tide thing. Although I'm a strong swimmer, I experience a small amount of anxiety when I'm on large bodies of water. This has been the case ever since I was a kid and witnessed a drowning on the beach in Port Aransas … near Corpus Christi. It seems every couple of years I read about a ferry disaster in the PH. It's a little concerning I must admit … or maybe I'm just being irrational?

    1. I ride the ferry perhaps once a month from Bohol to Cebu. I used to pay a little extra for the inner cabin where they have a/c and a movie. But then I found I enjoyed the ‘open air’ deck, which happens to be a little cheaper. Then, after that recent big ferry accident, I’ve stuck with the open-air seating. Up there, if anything happens you grab a vest and jump out. But the inner-cabin, you’re bottle-necked with only 4 exits. The water is warm and the sharks run in the deep waters so.. I’ll take my chances on the open-air rather than the inner deck. 🙂

  2. Hey Henry, what about Jellyfish?
    We have a couple of deadly ones in OZ – Box Jellyfish – Deadly, but only found in tropical areas, Iracangese (I think thats how you spell it) – Just as deadly as the Box Jellyfish but not as common – also only found in tropical areas, another nasty bugger is the Portugese Man of War or Blue Bottle – not deadly, unless you are alergic to its sting, found all around OZ, but the nasty thing about this one is that its sting is still active even after they wash up on the beach, you can still be stung just going for a bare foot stroll or run along the beach.

    “I don’t know everything, but I know a lot and I am always willing to learn more.”

  3. Have a friend from overseas send you a mosquito repellant.Just a suggestion.One of the best is called,”Off!”Mosquitoes there cause malaria! Have you experienced flying roaches! Watch out, you kill one and others attack you! One bit my sister by her nose, it got swollen! Take a lot of precautions! I know it’s kind of scary, but life is a challenge! Again, be cautious!

  4. About sites to see for best restos, go to Ang Pinaka……yummy or just plain Ang Pinaka…. It shows places from different parts of the Philippines, w/c rates from 1 tp 10 best restaurants.The , an is bald, and has some co-hosts exploring the restos.You’ll find it very interesting! Enjoy and agaon be safe, God bless!

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